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Now open—the LensCulture Portrait Awards! For the first time ever, we’re offering two exceptional exhibition opportunities: our winners, jurors’ picks, and finalists will show their work at Photo London in May and during the opening week in Arles this July. These are two of the world’s most important photo events—don’t miss this incredible opportunity to be seen alongside the biggest names in photography! More info: www.lensculture.com/portrait-awards-2018 --- Photo by Candace Karch, @sugarbeam. From the series "Ms. Ulmer," a touching portrait of a woman whose life-long companion has been art. Each day, for 90 years, she has drawn, illustrated, posed and created—doing her small part to bring a little more beauty into the world.

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We’re thrilled to announce the LensCulture Portrait Awards! For the first time ever, we’re offering two exceptional exhibition opportunities: our winners, jurors’ picks, and finalists will show their work at Photo London in May and during the opening week in Arles this July. These are two of the world’s most important photo events—don’t miss this incredible opportunity to be seen alongside the biggest names in photography! www.lensculture.com/portrait-awards-2018 Our esteemed jurors are seeking compelling portraits from all over the world. Benefits include projection of your work at international festivals, written feedback, worldwide media coverage, and exposure to our audience of 2.8 million. Participate in our global photography community—enter today! Deadline: February 27, 2018 Photo by Romina Ressia, @rominaressia More at www.facebook.com/rominaressia1

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Today we will be sharing three photos from the upcoming exhibition at @thephotographersgallery titled “Poetry of Place: Paul Hart’s Landscapes” (running January 18 - February 18, with a private viewing beginning at 6 pm this Thursday). British photographer, Paul Hart (b.1961) has spent the past thirteen years exploring human relationships with the land through photographs devoid of people. This retrospective will highlight three bodies of work: Truncated (2005-2008), Farmed (2009-2015) and Drained (2016-2017). We will be posting one image from each series. Enjoy! --- Holbeach Bank. From the series “Farmed,” which explores a wide-open landscape in which monoculture is at the core. This environment is comprised primarily of straight lines with a flat horizon. Hart’s narrative pinpoints the objects that remain, when the surrounding have all been cleared by modern agricultural practice. He conveys nature’s vulnerability within this unsheltered and unprotected state. For more, see @paulhartartist

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Today we will be sharing three photos from the upcoming exhibition at @thephotographersgallery titled “Poetry of Place: Paul Hart’s Landscapes” (running January 18 - February 18, with a private viewing beginning at 6 pm this Thursday). British photographer, Paul Hart (b.1961) has spent the past 13 years exploring human relationships with the land through photographs devoid of people. This retrospective will highlight three bodies of work: Truncated (2005-2008), Farmed (2009-2015) and Drained (2016-2017). We will be posting one image from each series. Enjoy! --- Hurn’s End. From the series “Drained,” which concentrates on an area of land lying barely above sea level. Located a few miles from the coastal area known as The Wash in the UK, the series is a personal interpretation of a region imbued with a very specific and unique character. For more, see @paulhartartist

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Today we will be sharing three photos from the upcoming exhibition at @thephotographersgallery titled “Poetry of Place: Paul Hart’s Landscapes” (running January 18 - February 18, with a private viewing beginning at 6 pm this Thursday). British photographer, Paul Hart (b.1961) has spent the past 13 years exploring our relationships with the land through photographs devoid of people. This retrospective will highlight three bodies of work: Truncated (2005-2008), Farmed (2009-2015), and Drained (2016-2017). We will be posting one image from each series. Enjoy! --- Portal. Silver gelatin print, made by Hart. From the series “Truncated,” a tightly focused portrayal of an aging pine forest plantation in Derbyshire, England. For more, see @paulhartartist

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“Critical Archives III: Identities” is the main exhibition of MedPhoto Festival 2017-2018, which is taking place at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rethymno, Crete from December 20th until March 20th, 2018. This year’s MedPhoto (@medphoto_festival ) hosts a mosaic of photographic projects from or about Europe that depict the old and the new face of people in Europe and capture European societies in this procedure of transformation. Today, we will be posting images from three of our favorite projects shown at the festival. Learn more via each photographer’s Instagram/website or through the festival. Enjoy! --- In 2010, as politicians discussed austerity measures with EU officials, TV were broadcasting scenes of rioting and unrest in the streets of Athens. Reacting to those images and playing the game of disinformation abuse, photographer Petros Efstathiadis sets up a parallel and ironic universe created out of that sudden "peur du Grec." He makes up an armour of artifacts and stand-in heroes. He styles models as rebels impersonated by the locals of his small village. They pose as anonymous partisans or prisoners, in garages, warehouses or living rooms. These are pictures of anonymous people, lost in the battle, rebels without a name or face, standing for potential heroes or unknown soldiers who didn’t choose their side, like a small troop in the middle of the battlefield, simply fighting to resist. From the series "Lohos" by Petros Efsthadiades, courtesy CAN Christina Androulidaki Gallery www.petrosefstathiadis.com

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“Critical Archives III: Identities” is the main exhibition of MedPhoto Festival 2017-2018, which is taking place at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rethymno, Crete from December 20th until March 20th, 2018. This year’s MedPhoto (@medphoto_festival ) hosts a mosaic of photographic projects from or about Europe that depict the old and the new face of people in Europe and capture European societies in this procedure of transformation. Today, we will be posting images from three of our favorite projects shown at the festival. Learn more via each photographer’s Instagram / website or through the festival. Enjoy! --- Let us imagine a Castle, old but in continuous configuration, a monument of the past as well as an active social territory for the present, symbolically unreachable but at the same time ordinarily familiar. It always stands there, prominent, seemingly having free access and invisible owners and keepers, or is it that they don’t exist at all? Of course, at times it excludes, it shrinks, it imposes strict protocols and many terrible secrets are whispered about it, but it’s alright, there are things that we don’t understand as well, mechanisms that we don’t comprehend. Even so the Castle is there, solid, it defines us and we define it. Let’s call this castle “Europe.” From the book “The Castle” by Federico Clavarino. More info: www.federicoclavarino.com/castle.html

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“Critical Archives III: Identities” is the main exhibition of MedPhoto Festival 2017-2018, which is taking place at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rethymno, Crete from December 20th until March 20th, 2018. This year’s MedPhoto (@medphoto_festival ) hosts a mosaic of photographic projects from or about Europe that depict the old and the new face of people in Europe and capture European societies in this process of transformation. Today, we will be posting images from three of our favorite projects shown at the festival. Learn more via each photographer’s Instagram / website or through the festival. Enjoy! --- Italy officially hosts 5,014,437 foreign citizens, which represents 8.2% of the country’s population. Indeed, Italy accommodates 187 different foreign communities (from almost all the nationalities of the world). A few months ago, in response to the European policy on the current migration phenomenon, I decided I wanted to try to make one portrait for each nationality in the country. From the project "One Of..." by Davide Monteleone, @davidemonteleonestudio

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At Nalukataq, the summer whaling festival, the village comes out to celebrate a successful whaling season and to give thanks to the whale for its gift. Here, successful whalers do the blanket toss. They are thrown up to thirty feet in the air, and depend on everyone's hands to land safely. This trust goes back millennia, and ensures intimacy among the growing population in Iñupiaq villages. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This is my last post for the week. I have been sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you enjoyed following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delved into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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“Whaling is community. It takes a village to pull up a whale,” says whaling captain Ned Arey. This bowhead is being pulled onto the ice by dozens of Iñupiat, who work tirelessly for 8 hours or more. This whale broke through the thin sea ice several times before being abandoned due to the danger—an irreversible symptom of the warming Arctic Ocean. The future of this practice is very much in doubt due to environmental changes. The effect on the community remains to be seen. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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Beluga whales are trapped by sea ice as shifting winds create unstable conditions. Though some western villages hunt belugas, Iñupiat that hunt bowhead whales prefer to simply watch the white whales as they migrate past in the spring. Yugu Ningeok remembers touching one when he was young, “I lay quiet on the ice and hundreds passed by." --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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An Iñupiaq whaling camp rests on the sea ice, still miles away from the edge, where hunting takes place. As climate change alters the composition of the sea ice, it has become increasingly difficult to break a trail through miles of ice ridges and reach the edge. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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A large female walrus eyes the camera while protectively guarding its two young pups. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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Members of Yugu crew clean the hide of an eight-foot nanuq, or polar bear, shot while defending camp. Starving and desperate, it stalked into the whaling camp, 15 yards away from members of the crew and photographer Kiliii Yuyan. Some Iñupiat believe declining sea ice is responsible for starving bears and their increased desperation in recent years. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling.

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Whaling requires an around-the-clock watch. Aside the threat of polar bears, there is the ever-present danger of an ivu, or collision of the pack ice into the shore. Much like sped-up plate tectonics, a destructive crash is often preceded by only a moment’s notice and a vigilant crewmember waking up the sleeping crew. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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Iñupiaq elder Foster Simmonds was taught to whale when he was a child, but was taken away to an Indian boarding school for much of his youth. He returned with a fierce dedication to revitalize the traditions of his grandparents' generation, especially whaling. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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Bernadette Adams was the first Iñupiaq woman to harpoon a whale. “I happen to have no brothers, so I had to find some way to help the family out,” says Bernadette. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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A young polar bear stares wistfully at the recently butchered carcass of a bowhead. While spring and fall whale hunts provide a source of food for the bears, the fall hunt is especially critical for bears on the verge of starvation caused by reduced pack ice in the summer months. Many Iñupiat prefer to let the bears feed provided they maintain a safe distance from people. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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Pack ice, visible in the blood-red sunset of the Arctic, moves along with the current on the same migratory path as spring bowhead whales. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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Kanisan Ningeok scans the horizon for the telltale spouts of bowhead whales while drinking imported soda. Although traditional foods are widely known to be healthier to Iñupiat, Western commodities like soda and crackers have become popular, leading to high rates of diet-related diseases in the Arctic. --- Hello everyone, my name is Kiliii Yuyan (@kiliiiyuyan ). This week, I will be sharing my series “People of the Whale.” It was produced over the course of three years near the Iñupiaq village of Utqiagviq in Alaska. Over this time, Utqiagviq became a second home, and my Iñupiaq friends a second family. The intent of this project is to help viewers understand that without whaling, this community would lose its identity. The neighboring Iñuit in Canada lost their right to hunt whales in the 1970s, and now have one of the highest rates of suicide in the world. Meanwhile, the North Slope Alaskan Iñupiaq have the lowest rates of suicide among Arctic indigenous groups. That’s a pretty big difference—at least partly attributable to an unbroken tradition of whaling. It’s my job as a photographer to bring an accurate and empathetic portrayal of the communities I work with. I hope you will enjoy following along. --- Editorial note: The photographs in this story delve into the practice of whaling as carried out by aboriginal groups in North Alaska. Although whaling continues to be a source of controversy, by the terms of the internationally ratified 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) permits the hunting of whales by aboriginal groups as long as it occurs on a subsistence basis.

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